Poetry Tow Truck 9: Beginnings and Endings

It’s that time again – time to use the work of other writers for our own purposes.  This time, choose a rhyming couplet from any poem by another author. (Or one of your own – you never know how you might inspire yourself!)

Write the first line vertically down the left margin and the second line vertically down the far right margin. I am using two lines from “At the Doll Hospital” by Robin Ekiss (from the book The Mansion of Happiness).

Among so many eyes fixed in glass,

where will she find her tenderness?

Among 8888888888888888888888888888888888888888 where

so 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888 will

many 8888888888888888888888888888888888888 she

eyes 88888888888888888888888888888888888888 find

fixed 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888 her

in 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888 tenderness

glass

Now draft a poem completely within the parameters of these beginning and ending words for each line.  You will end up with a block of text that functions as a poem. And, since the rhyming lines were your base, you will have a built-in attention to sound.

Here is my attempt from the lines above:

After the Disaster

Among rusted pans and cracked windowpanes where

so many promises have fractured  – a once-strong will.

Many lies now hobble together a broken hope. She

eyes the pieces , uncertain of what she will find.

Fixed with filmy glue, she does not know what left her

in tatters, but she stitches herself together with tenderness.

Glass splinters emerge from the wounds. And she bleeds.

Choose a couple of lines and get going. It’s a little poem – it won’t take long.

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18 thoughts on “Poetry Tow Truck 9: Beginnings and Endings

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